Saturday, October 23, 2010

Lucy in New York (10/10/2010)

     After lounging for most of the day (I refuse to admit the possibility of my body aging) and “resting” (read - the thigh muscles actually felt bruised from so many subway steps on Saturday) we ventured out to church (and more subway steps.) This was only after consuming an out-law-able amount of ibuprofen to dull the pain of moving (aging.)
     I braved the climb uphill to Broadway Street (only with Katie pulling and Jeffery pushing) and managed to walk the five blocks to the subway entrance. The constant lure of different food smells on each block had absolutely nothing to do with prodding me along (seriously!)
     THEN it happened! I saw stairs again and my aching legs revolted (well almost, they did not have the energy.) Turns out going down was the easy part. The only thought registering with my brain was that at the end of the ride there would be more steps to conquer. Imagine the delight when we disembarked at Lincoln Center and saw an escalator! Had I been able to, I think I might have knelt and worshipped the conveyor belt that would be transporting my aching body up to street level.
     We surfaced at Lincoln Center where we had our first glimpse of a Trump Tower (they are magnificent.) I stopped in my tracks to gawk at the splendid building (I was really resting.)
     Katie (my daughter) and Jude (her husband) walked Jeffery and I to a stunning church and we parted ways with promises of meeting up later at their apartment (across town) (way across town.) We waved them off, confident that we would have no difficulty finding our way back – alone. Those of you who know me, love me, or follow my blog (or all of the above) you may stop laughing NOW!

     We emerged from Sunday church services and made our way down the block to the subway entrance in Lincoln Center. This was simple (my daughter stood us at the entrance to the church not an hour before, turned us around, and pointed to the Trump building and the world planet sculpture and said, “Remember, walk this way.”) Well, we were feeling a bit cocky (confident.) We walked toward the landmarks, rounded the corner, and there was the entrance to the subway, AND those wonderful escalators!
     We followed the signs to the “1” train going "uptown" (as we had been instructed to) and we joined the throngs of New Yorkers, acting as though we belonged and knew exactly where we were headed.
     We stood on the platform watching for the “1” train. The “D” train flew by. The “C” train came and went. We told each other to keep watching for the “1” train knowing (hoping) it would be next. I do not know if it was the bewildered look on our faces or the desperate (way too confident) sound in our voices, but this nice woman asked us if we needed help. The way we pounced on her will no doubt stop her from ever asking anyone else if they need help.
     Safely tucked on to the “1” train heading “uptown”, we could finally laugh about it and of course, assure each other we knew exactly what we were doing the entire time.
     By the way, we did find our way back, even after exiting the subway on the wrong side of the street. If you turn in a circle enough times, I guarantee that in your delirium, something will look familiar. Head that way as fast as you can walk.

Saturday, October 2, 2010

An integrated Heaven?

     It was Saturday morning, CNN was on the television, and I had the opportunity to hear a very intriguing interview with two black preachers. The message of one black preacher was that Heaven is integrated and all churches should follow suit. The message of the second preacher was the black church was the only thing “they” had left that truly belonged to “them.” “They” and “them” were referring to black people.
     A community in California has very successfully integrated their black church to include all races, and has “white” people serving on their board, much to the pride of the black preacher. He admitted with a chuckle that the white folks voice their opinions much louder than the black folks do at this time. I like his way of thinking and I am sure that eventually all those nice black folks will learn to raise their voices as well.
     This forward-thinking preacher made the comment that maybe the other preacher is not preaching real Christianity in wanting to keep his church segregated. I truly admire his tenacity and I truly wish his words could reach across the nation. This interview left me thinking, “I want to go to your church.” Preachers like this man could heal the world if only there were more of them.
     So, is there an integrated Heaven and should we be working toward imitating Heaven on earth? Sounds like a good plan to me.