Tuesday, April 20, 2010

My Dog's Adventures

     How do I start except for saying my poor dog. First, she fell off of the wharf on Sunday and last night she got locked in my husband’s workshop for the night. I was teaching religion and while I was gone, it started thundering, which Sentry is deathly afraid of, so she kept following my husband, Jeffery, in and out of his workshop. Once she observes a routine, she becomes complacent so she must have stayed inside for a while and when he closed up, she got locked in. That was around 7pm last night because that’s when I drove up and I assumed she was under the house because of the rain.

     This morning I went out to walk and I called and called and rang the bell - no Sentry. I looked under the house, in her house, in the barn - no Sentry. By this time I am getting frantic (remember, I am SO good in a crisis) and I am almost in tears telling hubby that he has to come and help me because I can't find her. THEN, the idea came to me that she may be in the workshop (has happened before) and so I knocked on the door and she started whimpering. She doesn't bark when I call her; which I do not understand. It would make my life so much easier. I wouldn't have to panic quite as often.
     When I opened the door and out she ran, she followed my trail back and forth and round and round before she came to me. That trail was a definite indication of how frantic I was quickly becoming. She is perfectly fine now but probably won't go in to the workshop for a while.

     Getting back to our Sunday event when Sentry toppled off of the wharf - what a frantic time again! My husband and I were sitting in the swing on the wharf enjoying the slight breeze and peacefulness. Sentry was lying in her usual spot – the edge of the wharf – watching the fish jump and the minos swim by. She is fascinated by them. It all happened so quickly that I’m not sure what exactly happened, but the next thing I knew is that she was in the bayou! She just seemed to roll right off of the wharf and SPLASH!

     Of course, I am sooooooo very helpful in a crisis. I did the only thing I could think of – I started screaming! Now, we all know how much that helped. My husband was sitting right next to me – I am fairly certain my screaming did nothing to alert him to what he had already ascertained – the dog was in the water. Now most people probably wouldn’t panic. They know dogs can swim but you have to remember – this is MY dog and she’s never been in anything deeper than the ten inch ditch in the back yard; and that, she just splashes in. She still had her leash on – thank goodness – so we (make that hubby, not screaming me) were able to guide her around the pilings and the crab trap and the fishing line, 20 feet down the wharf to ground. None the worse for wear, she shook a few times and went right back to her spot, you guessed it, on the edge of the wharf.
     Fortunately, life went quickly back to normal and we went back to swinging. (Little did I know that there would soon be another crisis.......)


  1. You have a BEAUTIFUL friend in Sentry! And your stories about her are wonderful!

    I need to be her adopted Aunt Bev for a while. We had to put our 20-year-old dog AJ down last week. I miss her more than words can express. Our home is empty and silent now. It's unbearable. So until my heart can heal, I'm going to borrow Sentry's stories. Okay, friend?

  2. My heart goes out to you for your loss. Sentry will be eight years old this summer.


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